Chronic fatigue syndrome can cause problems with our vision. We may experience foggy, blurred vision. The eyes may have trouble focusing in on objects or words. – MDA
By Amy Norton
Study reveals evidence that it’s ‘not made up,’ researcher says

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) — People with chronic fatigue syndrome show a distinct pattern of immune system proteins in their spinal fluid — a finding that could shed light on the “brain fog” that marks the condition, researchers say.

The new study found that, compared with healthy people, those with chronic fatigue syndrome had lower levels of certain immune-system proteins called cytokines in the fluid that bathes the spinal cord and brain.

 The exception was one particular cytokine, which was elevated in not only people with chronic fatigue, but also those with multiple sclerosis.

The finding could offer clues as to why people with chronic fatigue syndrome typically have problems with memory, concentration and thinking, said lead researcher Dr. Mady Hornig, a professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York City.

The study also bolsters evidence that some type of immune dysfunction underlies the puzzling disorder, Hornig said.

Chronic fatigue syndrome is known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, or ME/CFS. In the United States, it affects up to 2.5 million people, according to the Institute of Medicine, a scientific panel that advises the federal government.

In February, the IOM released a report affirming that chronic fatigue syndrome is a legitimate medical condition that many health professionals still misunderstand — or even dismiss as a figment of patients’ imagination….

Read more: http://www.webmd.com/chronic-fatigue-syndrome/news/20150331/clues-to-brain-fog-in-chronic-fatigue-patients-found-in-spinal-fluid?ecd=soc_fb_040115_news_cfsclues

Source: Web MD

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