Poor lighting at home can affect vision

In  examinations of older adults, average scores on vision tests can be better in the clinic than at home. Sometimes patients are able to read at least two or more lines extra on an eye chart in the clinic compared with what they could read at home. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., suggests dim lighting may be the culprit.

The study is published online in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

The researchers studied 175 patients ages 55-90. These included 126 with glaucoma. All patients had their vision measured at home and at the Glaucoma and Comprehensive Eye Clinics at the School of Medicine. The average scores on vision tests were better in the clinic than at home, Bhorade said. Nearly 30 percent of the patients with glaucoma were able to read at least two or more lines extra on an eye chart in the clinic than on the same chart at their homes, and 39 percent of those with advanced glaucoma read three or more additional lines in the clinic.

The same results were observed with up-close vision. More than 20 percent of patients were able to read two or more additional lines of text at the doctor’s office than they did at home. “Older adults with and without glaucoma had similar differences in vision between the clinic and home,” said Bhorade, an associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences……..

Read More: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/health/fl-jjps-vision-1029-20141028-story.html

 

Source: Sun Sentinel

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