Schlemm’s canal, also known as canal of Schlemm or the scleral venous sinus, is a circular channel in the eye that collects aqueous humor from the anterior chamber and delivers it into the bloodstream via the anterior ciliary veins.
A Jackson Laboratory based research team has conducted a comprehensive exploration of an eye structure known as Schlemm’s canal: a key gatekeeper for the proper flow of eye fluid, presenting a number of insights relevant to glaucoma and other diseases.

For the study publishing July 22 in the Open Access journal PLOS Biology, the researchers at JAX and Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston developed a new, “whole-mount,” three-dimensional approach to analyse mouse models that have been engineered to host fluorescent proteins, to determine how Schlemm’s canal forms in the eye and in relation to neighbouring tissues.

Due to its roles in fluid flow and intraocular pressure, Schlemm’s canal is directly involved in glaucoma, a blinding disease that affects more than 70 million people worldwide.
The report, according to first author Krishnakumar Kizhatil, Ph.D., an associate research scientist in the laboratory of JAX Professor and Howard Hughes Medical Investigator Simon W.M. John, Ph.D., “provides new understanding and tools that will facilitate molecular understanding of Schlemm’s canal and its critical….
More: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-07-distinctive-developmental-drainage-tube-eye.html
Source: Medical Express

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