By Indra Balaratnam – July 23, 2019 @ 12:17pm

Age-related macular degeneration is one of the main causes of vision loss in older people.

THE World Health Organisation estimates that nine per cent of the world’s population is over 65 years old. By 2050, that figure is likely to jump to 17 per cent.

Fact is, the average life expectancy is rising faster than it has in the last 50 years.

What this potentially means is we are living longer but not necessarily healthier.

With a rapidly rising ageing population, it is inevitable that we will be living more years with chronic lifestyle diseases and impairments.

One such impairment involves our eyes and vision in the form of age-related macular degeneration or AMD.

AMD is one of the main causes of vision loss in older people, affecting up to between 30 and 50 million globally.

As its name implies, the risk for developing this condition is age. The macula is a sensitive area in our retina that gives us good vision and ability to see colour.

As we age, the metabolism of our retinal area becomes less efficient. Deposits of waste matter, called drusens, accumulate in the eye.

This causes the eye to lack nutrients to keep it healthy. Over time, this damages the light cells in the macula region. Eventually, your central vision will be blurred and less acute.

You will feel no symptoms. Plus, if AMD affects only one eye and you can see well with the other one, you may not even be aware that you have the condition.

The risk factors for developing AMD include:

• Family history — the chances of getting AMD is higher if it runs in your family……..

Read more: https://www.nst.com.my/lifestyle/heal/2019/07/506475/eat-well-nutrition-ageing-eyes

Source: New Straits Times

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