Eye conditions associated with diabetes

You may have heard that diabetes causes eye problems and may lead to blindness. People with diabetes do have a higher risk of blindness than people without diabetes. But most people who have diabetes have nothing more than minor eye disorders. The incidence of such eye problems increases with duration of uncontrolled blood glucose levels.
With regular check-ups, you can keep minor problems minor. And if you do develop a major problem, there are treatments that often work well if you begin them right away.
If you have eye problems and diabetes, don’t buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels.
High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (70-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal.
Glaucoma
Glaucoma occurs when pressure builds up in the eye. The pressure pinches the blood vessels that carry blood to the retina and optic nerve. Vision is gradually lost because the retina and nerve are damaged.
People with diabetes are more likely to suffer from glaucoma than people without diabetes. The longer someone has had diabetes, the more common glaucoma is. Risk also increases with age.
There are several treatments for glaucoma. Some use drugs to reduce pressure in the eye, while others involve surgery.
Read more: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/listen-to-your-sugar/Eye-conditions-associated-with-diabetes/articleshow/52288849.cms
Source: The Times of India

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