Working with mice, a multicenter team of researchers has found a new way to reduce the abnormal blood vessel growth and leakage in the eye that accompany some eye diseases. The finding could lead to the development of new drugs for wet macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

The team reports their findings in the Sept. 2 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

The current standard of clinical care for  and  is repeated injections into the eye of antibodies against a protein called VEGF. Each injection costs thousands of dollars. This study revealed a way to indirectly mitigate the bad effects of VEGF by activating a biochemical chain of events, or pathway, that suppresses the protein.
This indirect way of reducing VEGF’s effects is not as dangerous as directly blocking the protein. Antibodies that block VEGF must be injected into the eye to minimize side effects to the rest of the body, such as stroke. But a drug with the indirect action identified in this study could potentially be injected under the skin with relative safety, the researchers say. Patients could thus give themselves…. Read more: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-09-mouse-advance-treatment-common-eye.html
Source: Medical Xpress

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