Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness in the working-age population of most developed countries. The increasing number of individuals with diabetes worldwide suggests that DR and DME will continue to be major contributors to vision loss and associated functional impairment for years to come. Early detection of retinopathy in individuals with diabetes is critical in preventing visual loss, but current methods of screening fail to identify a sizable number of high-risk patients.- ADA

Number of people with diabetes related complications to grow

by: Ashwin Kumar
KUALA LUMPUR: Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are common microvascular complications in people with diabetes.
Diabetic retinopathy is a disease affecting the blood vessels of the retina.
DME occurs when fluid leaks into the center of the macula, the light-sensitive part of the retina responsible for sharp, direct vision.
Consultant Ophthalmologist and Vitreo-Retina Surgeon, Dr Barkeh Hanim Jumaat said out of 10,856 patients that were registered with the Diabetic Eye Registry in Malaysia, more than two thirds have never had any prior eye examination.
“About 92% of patients have Diabetes Mellitus type II.
“With the incidences of diabetes steadily climbing in our country, it is projected that the number of people impacted with DME will also grow,” she said in a media briefing at the Gardens Hotel here today.
“DME is the leading cause of moderate-to-severe vision loss in patients with diabetes, and is a leading cause of blindness in working age populations in most developed countries,” she said.
Dr Barkeh said the latest treatment available for DME is an anti vascular endothelial growth factor (Anti-VEGF) which is injected into the eye.
“With the new anti-VEGF option, patients require initial monthly injections for the first five months followed by every other month until stabilisation is achieved,” she said…….
more: http://www.thesundaily.my/news/1394991
Source: the Sunday Daily
 

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