People that have macular degeneration can benefit from this because they contain nutrients and unsaturated fatty acids such as Omega 3. Fats are a necessary part of the human diet. They maintain the integrity of the nervous system, fuel cells and boost the immune system. Two omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to be important for proper visual development and retinal function.
Discover how walnuts, almonds and other nuts help lower your cholesterol when eaten as part of a balanced diet.
By Mayo Clinic Staff

Eating nuts as part of a healthy diet can be good for your heart.  They contain unsaturated fatty acids and other nutrients, are a great snack food, too. They’re inexpensive, easy to store and easy to pack when you’re on the go.

The type you eat isn’t that important, although some have more heart-healthy nutrients and fats than do others. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts — you name it — almost every type has a lot of nutrition packed into a tiny package. If you have heart disease, eating nuts instead of a less healthy snack can help you more easily follow a heart-healthy diet.

 Can eating nuts help your heart?
People who eat nuts as part of a heart-healthy diet can lower the low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol level in their blood. High LDL is one of the primary causes of heart disease.

Eating nuts may reduce your risk of developing blood clots that can cause a fatal heart attack. Nuts also appear to improve the health of the lining of your arteries.

What’s in nuts that’s thought to be heart healthy?
Source: Mayo Clinic
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