Scientists find mechanism behind side effects in vision-loss treatment

Date:December 6, 2016
Source:The Scripps Research Institute
Summary:A common class of drugs for vision loss may actually add to the problem in some patients, according to new research.

A common class of drugs for vision loss may actually add to the problem in some patients, according to new research co-led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).

The new study in animal models suggests that some therapies for age-related wet macular degeneration (ARMD) may leave the eyes — and kidneys — of some patients vulnerable to cellular damage by hampering the body’s ability to make a protective molecule called inhibitory complement factor H (CFH). The study is also the first to identify a common pathway in two seemingly disparate organs: the eye and the kidney.
“This suggests we need to be more cautious in our approach with patients,” said TSRI Professor Martin Friedlander, who co-led the study with Moin A. Saleem of the University of Bristol.
The findings were published December 5, 2016, online ahead of print in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
A Link to Cellular Damage
The new study focused on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a molecule that drives the development of new blood vessels, regulates their permeability and maintains their normal function. In cases of age-related wet macular degeneration, VEGF causes leaky blood vessels to grow in the eye, leading to vision loss as blood and cellular debris escape the vessels.
To counter blood vessel growth, patients with age-related macular degeneration are frequently prescribed medication composed of VEGF inhibitors to reduce their levels of the molecule. About one-third of patients respond well to treatments, but about one-third do not respond and one-third have continued or increased vision loss…..
Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161206094232.htm
Source: Science Daily
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