Strabismus  is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other. It typically involves a lack of coordination between the extraocular muscles, which prevents bringing the gaze of each eye to the same point in space, thus hampers proper binocular vision, and which may adversely affect depth perception which can increase the risk of falls in the elderly. Strabismus is primarily managed by ophthalmologists, optometrists, and orthoptists. -MDA

BY SHEREEN LEHMAN

(Reuters Health) – Older people with strabismus, where one eye points slightly inward or outward affecting vision, are about 27 percent more likely than people without the condition to be injured by a fall, according to a new study. The disorder, often called “wandering eye,” becomes more common with age and can cause double vision or depth perception problems because the two eyes are not pointing in the same direction.

 Previous studies have shown that having other eye disorders like cataracts, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration increases the risk of injuries, fractures or falls, the study team writes in JAMA Opthalmology. But this is the first to examine whether so-called binocular vision problems have the same effect. “Strabismus in adults is becoming more prevalent as the aging population increases and we do not know the impact of strabismus on patient quality of life and morbidity,” lead author Dr. Stacy Pineles told Reuters Health in an email.

 “We hypothesized that strabismus could cause double vision or diminished depth perception, and we wanted to see whether this was associated with injuries such as falls,fractures, and musculoskeletal injuries,” said Pineles, an ophthalmologist with the Jules Stein Eye Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. Pineles and her colleagues looked at a random sample of Medicare claims for more than two million beneficiaries over the years 2002 to 2011……

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/30/us-health-elderly-vision-falls-idUSKBN0IJ2JT20141030

Source: Reuters Health

Image: http://www.stlukeseye.com/ 

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